City of Portland Archives and Record Center. Record # B/11981. Police Historical/Archival Investigative Files: People’s Army Jamboree (women’s liberation parade) City of Portland Archives and Record Center. Record # B/11981. Police Historical/Archival Investigative Files: People’s Army Jamboree (women’s liberation parade)

Investigators Fixed Their Gaze on Feminists

Scan down the list of groups the police investigators listed for surveillance, and you’ll discover the following groups with the word “women” or “feminist” in the title. Then there are other files—Mom’s Garage supported women who wished to be auto mechanics. Lavinia Press was the innovative newspaper associated with Women’s Night Watch. The featured image in this report actually comes from the police investigator’s extensive photographic surveillance of the People’s Army Jamboree—a coalition of groups coalesced in protest to then-President Richard Nixon’s 1970 visit to Portland. What becomes clear in the pile-up of these files is that these investigators feared women organizing

City of Portland Archives and Record Center. Record # B/11981. Police Historical/Archival Investigative Files: People’s Army Jamboree (women’s liberation parade City of Portland Archives and Record Center. Record # B/11981. Police Historical/Archival Investigative Files: People’s Army Jamboree (women’s liberation parade

Poem Catalogues Feared Women

As I encountered the preponderance of surveillance on women, I began to think about how to write about the collective whole while addressing the extraordinary diversity of women. My poetic material–language—is socially made: all my words are words I’ve heard or read (except the occasional neologism!) Sometimes I emphasize this fact more through collage, and I’m employing that technique in what I’m still referring to as my “she-poem”